The Hunger Games

Although The Hunger Games has just only released the second movie a few months ago it has caught the attention of fans young and old around the world. It started with the books written by Suzanne Collins that has now become a box office favorite. The Hunger Games is seen through the eyes of 16-year-old Katniss Everdeen who volunteers as a tribute for the Hunger Games. The Hunger Games were put in place after a rebellion 70 years ago in order to keep the poor people in line. With over 15 million likes, people are able to keep up with what is going on after the movie ends. Image

 

According to Henry Jenkins, Transmedia storytelling is “a process where integral elements of a fiction get dispersed systematically across multiple delivery channels for the purpose of creating a unified and coordinated entertainment experience.” Basically, information can be obtained through more than just one source; whether it’s through twitter and Facebook accounts, books, video games, etc. The two elements I have chosen from transmedia storytelling are world building and additive comprehension.

 

According to Henry
Jenkins, stories are not just based on individual characters and plots, but complex fictional worlds, which can sustain multiple interrelated characters and their stories. The fictional world of Panem is set in the future in North America. This world is very complex because there are 13 districts. The capitol is the first district and the other 12 are the poor citizens who can barely feed themselves. Every year two12-18 year olds are chosen from each district to fight until death in order to keep the districts under control. In the first Hunger Games movie you only see what Katniss is seeing from District 12. However in Catching Fire you get a more, in depth look to the other districts.

 

Additive comprehension, as explained by Neil Young, is a way to introduce new information to change our views on the original story. When reading the books you are presented with more information than what is shown in the movies. Although the books are close in nature to the movies, information is left out that could change views. As well as the new video game The Hunger Games Adventures. This game allows you to play as any character you choose and must complete missions in order to be the “victor”Image

 

Works Cited

Jenkins, Henry. “Transmedia Storytelling 101.” Confessions of an AcaFan. Genesis Framework, 22 Mar. 2007. Web. 02 Mar. 2014.

Murray, Janet H. “Chapter 2: Harbingers of the Holodeck.” Hamlet on the Holodeck. New York: Free, A Division of Simon and Schuster, 1997. 27-64.

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By emt13

One comment on “The Hunger Games

  1. The first paragraph of the text includes some important background information for the reader, but organizing sentences for more natural transitions between ideas might help the reader follow your thoughts more easily. The second paragraph does a good job defining transmedia storytelling and providing an application to simplify the definition for the reader, though introducing Jenkins’s text would provide more context for the keywords. Remember that transmedia storytelling involves diverse media platforms, so comparing the first and second films of the movie series might not work as effectively as a comparison as comparing the first book in the series to the first film. The post describes Neil Young’s definition of additive comprehension, but remember to cite that in the text, since that information comes from Jenkins and not from Young. Try to avoid adding new information at the end of your text, which can make the writing seem rushed or unfinished—instead, end with a strong sentence or two that leave the reader with a clear sense of your main ideas.

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